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Wednesday, September 9, 2009

The Man Who Wins (Explanation with Reference to Context)

Wednesday, September 9, 2009 - 4 Comments

1. If you think you are beaten, you are

If you think you dare not, you don’t,

If you like to win, but you think you can’t,

It’s almost certain you won’t.

Reference to Context:

These lines haven been taken from the poem “The Man Who Wins” written by an anonymous poet.

In this poem poet explains that we should always cherish good and high thoughts in our mind. Due to strong will, firm confidence and high determination we will succeed in our lives.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that success or failure is always in our mind. If we think that we are defeated certainly we will be defeated. If we think that we will not be defeated surely we will not. If we want to win but we think that we can not win. It is sure that we will not win. Because thoughts are driving source behind our victory or defeat.

2. If you think you’ll lose you’re lost

For out in the world we find

Success begins with a fellow’s will

It’s all in the sate of mind.

Reference to Context:

These lines haven been taken from the poem “The Man Who Wins” written by an anonymous poet.

In this poem poet explains that we should always cherish good and high thoughts in our mind. Due to strong will, firm confidence and high determination we will succeed in our lives.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that a person loses only when he thinks that he will lose. Because in our world we see that success of a persons starts with his will and determination it is the force of thinking that drives us towards action. Because failure or success resides in our mind.

3. If you think you are out classed, you are,

You’ve got to think high to rise,

You’ve got to be sure of you self before,

You can never win a prize.

Reference to Context:

These lines haven been taken from the poem “The Man Who Wins” written by an anonymous poet.

In this poem poet explains that we should always cherish good and high thoughts in our mind. Due to strong will, firm confidence and high determination we will succeed in our lives.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that if we think that we are not better than others, certainly we will not be better. If we want to make successes in our lives we have to think for a rising high. If we want to participate in a competition we should have self confidence. Without self confidence we can never win a prize.

4. Life’s battles don’t always go

To the stronger or faster man,

But soon or late the man who wins

Is the man who thinks he can.

Reference to Context:

These lines haven been taken from the poem “The Man Who Wins” written by an anonymous poet.

In this poem poet explains that we should always cherish good and high thoughts in our mind. Due to strong will, firm confidence and high determination we will succeed in our lives.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that it is not necessary that the decision of life’s battles always go in favour of stronger or faster man. But sooner or later only that person is crowned with success who has full confidence in him self. It must have power to think that he can do every thing in this world.

There’s a Good Time Coming (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. There’s a good time coming, boys,

A good time coming;

We may not live to see the day,

But earth shall glisten in the ray,

Of the good time coming.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet addresses the boys and assures them that good time is about to come in near future. We may not be able to see that good day, but it will be seen by our next generation. The earth will be brightening by the effect of good time.

2. Cannon balls may add the truth,

But thought’s weapon stronger;

We’ll win our battle by its aid-

Wait a little longer.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that cannon balls will make the fact clear. In order to achieve the truth, battle no doubt could be fought, but constructive thoughts are stronger weapon which can make us to win the battle of truth. So, the good time is about to come, we should wait for a little time.

3. There’s a good time coming, boys,

A good time coming,

The pen shall supersede the sword,

And right, not might, shall be the lord.

In the good time coming.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that good time is about to come. In those days the pen will take place of sword, only right things will hold good against power and during that period every one will enjoy its own rights.

4. Worth not birth, shall rule the mankind,

And be acknowledged stronger;

The proper impulse has been given-

Wait a little longer.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that in that period a person will be honoured and respected on the basis of individual merits and not on the heredity basis. This change is in process we have to wait for little time.

5. There’s a good time coming boys,

A good time coming

War in all men’s eyes shall be

A monster of iniquity

In the good time coming.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that a good time is about to come when mankind will hate the war as the force of injustice and unfairness. The result will be that there will be peace and prosperity in the world.

6. Nations shall not quarrel then,

To prove which is the stronger;

Nor slaughter men for glory’s sake

Wait a little longer.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that when the good time will come there will be no wars and quarrels between nation of the world for the sake of power and domination and there will be no human killings for the sake of glory. You have to wait little more.

7. There’s a good time coming, boys,

A good time coming;

Let us aid it all we can,

Every woman and every man

The good time coming.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that let us give help to bring about good time in the world. Each one of us should aim at bringing about good time in the world.

8. Smallest helps, if rightly given,

Make the impulse stronger;

It will be strong enough one day

Wait a little longer.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “There’s a good time coming” written by Charles Mackay.

The poet believes that a good time is about to come, when there will be no wars, powerful will not rule the world and the pen will take place of sword.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that we should keep in our mind that within our own limited spheres of life, if we extend sincere co-operation and helps though smallest but with almost devotion, it would matter a lot and would motivate to those times to come soon. He assures that it will be strong one day when the good time actually comes in the world.

The Uses of Adversity (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. Fairer is the manuscript

When the reed is clipped;

Cleaner runs the message, when,

There is trimming of the pen.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The Uses of Adversity” written by an anonymous poet.

In this poem poet explains that adversity polishes a person. It makes him a perfect and practical man.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that when a person sharpens and trims pen made of reed it writes clearer and beautiful. The information sent in such writing is more legible and easy to understand.

2. Dimly burns the lantern, but

When its wick is cut

Perfect will its lustre be

Through the wick’s deficiency.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The Uses of Adversity” written by an anonymous poet.

In this poem poet explains that adversity polishes a person. It makes him a perfect and practical man.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that a lamp does not give bright light, but when a person cuts its wick and reduces its length it starts giving perfect and bright light.

The Minstrel Boy (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. The minstrel boy to the war is gone,

In the ranks of death you will find him,

His father’s sword eh has girded on,

And his wild harp slung behind him,

“Land of song!” said the warrior bard,

“Though all the world betrays thee,

One sword at least, thy rights shall guard,

One faithful harp shall praise thee!”

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The Minstrel Boy” written by Thomas Moore.

In this poem poet explains that it is impossible to bind the soul that is born free.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that musician boy has gone to fight in the war. He will be seen in the first ranks, where a persons faces death. He has put on his father’s sword around his waist and his rustic harp was hanging behind him. The poet who was writing poetry of war evens wrote that if whole world betrays the mother land but it is sure that there would be a sword that would protect its rights and there would be a harp which would play the songs of freedom of homeland.

2. The minstrel fell! But the foeman’s chain

Could not bring his proud soul under;

The harp he loved never spoke again,

For he tore its chards as under,

And said, “No chains shall sully thee,

Thou soul of love and bravery!

They songs were made for the pure and free,

They shall never sound in slavery.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The Minstrel Boy” written by Thomas Moore.

In this poem poet explains that it is impossible to bind the soul that is born free.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that the musician boy was killed in the war. But his proud soul was not conquered by the chains of enemy. The enemy defeated him physically but was not able to conquer his soul. His harp which was very dear to him did not sing more, because when he was wounded he tore its strings. He said to it that as it was soul of love and boldness so it could no be in a position to sing for enemy. Because it’s songs were for the pure and free people, not for the tyrant persons. So it’s songs would never be heard in slavery.

Casabianca (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. The boy stood on the burning deck,

Whence all but he had fled;

The flame that lit the battle’s wreck

Shone round him o’er the dead.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that Casabianca was standing on the board of the ship which was on fire. He was standing alone while all others had left the ship. The flames of fire rising on all sides. These flames were shining over dead bodies of the soldiers killed in the battle.

2. Yet beautiful and bright he stood,

As born to rule the storm,

A creature of Heroic blood

A proud, through child – like form.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the boy stood on the board of the ship inspite of burning flames. He looked very hardsome in the light of these flames. It seemed that he was born to govern over storms. He had inherited nobility from his fore fathers. Though he was of tender age, he looked brave and proud to carry out the command of father.

3. The flames rolled on – he would not go

Without his father’s word

That father faint in death below

His voice no longer heard.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess says that flames rushed at Casabianca. But he had resolved not to leave the place unless his father permitted him. His father was laying dead in the lower part of the ship so his voice could be heard no more.

4. He called aloud: “Say father! Say

If yet my task is done?”

He knew no that the chief tain lay

Unconscious of his son.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the boy called his father in a loud voice. He asked whether, the duty assigned to him was complete or not. He did not know that commander of the ship was unaware about the condition of his son.

5. “Speak father!” Once again he cried.

“If I may yet be gone”!

And but the booming shots replied,

And fast the flames rolled on.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the boy again cried and asked his father if he could go. He wanted to say more but his voice was drowned in the midst of heavy noise of guns and the flames rushed on very fast.

6. Upon his brow he felt their breath,

And in his waving hair,

And looked from that lone post of death,

In still, yet brave despair.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess says that the flames rushed at the boy. He felt their heat on his fore head and in waving hair. Though he knew, that his death was near but he stood quite and calm. He looked around him from place of death with bold heart though he was disappointed.

7. And shouted but once more aloud

“My father! Must I stay”?

While o’er him fast, through sail and shroud

The wreathing fires made way.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess says that the boy once again cried out in loud voice. He wanted to know if it was necessary for him to stay there. Just then the flames rushed through sails and ropes.

8. They wrapt the ship in splendour wild,

They caught the flag high,

And streamed above the gallant child,

Like banness in the sky.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the flames surrounded the ship and covered it on all sides. They even reached the flag which was flying very high. They also surrounded the brave boy like the flag’s shadows in the sky.

9. There came a burst of thunder sound,

The boy oh! Where was he?

Ask of the winds that far around

With fragments strewed the sea.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that suddenly a loud noise was heard there and no one can imagine that where the body of brave boy was. Only the winds could say which were blowing around the boy that where was he.

10. With mast and helm and pennon fair,

That well had borne their part;

But the noblest thing which perished there,

Was that young faithful heart!

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Casabianca” written by Felicia Dorothea Hemans.

In the poem poetess conveys the message of bravery, sacrifice, responsibility, patriotism and discipline through the story of Casabianca.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that part played by mast, rudder and the flag flying on mast is praise worthy. But the noblest thing which died there was the young obedient and disciplined heart, that was Casabianca.

King Bruce and the Spider (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. King Bruce of Scotland flung himself down

In a lonely mood to think,

Tis true he was monarch and wore a crown

But his heart was beginning to sink.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that King Robert Bruce of Scotland had been defeated in the battle field. Flung down himself on couch in despair, he was feeling very sad. He began to thing. No doubt he had been crowned as a king but the pressure of difficulties faced by him made him lose the heart.

2. For he had been trying to do a great deed,

To make his people glad;

He had tired and tried, but couldn’t succeed,

So became quite sad.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that King Robert Bruce had been trying to gain freedom for his country. He had fought many battles but he was defeated. He had been doing his best to make his people happy. Due to continuous failures he was disappointed.

3. He flung himself down in a low despair,

As grieved as man could be,

And after a while, as he pondered there

“I’ll give it all up” said he.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that King Robert Bruce threw himself down on couch in disappointment. He was stiken with grief. He thought over again and again and decided at last to give up the struggle.

4. Now just at the moment a spider dropped,

With it’s silken cob web clue,

And the king in the midst of his thinking stopped.

To see what the spider would do.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells just at the moment, when King Bruce was thinking to give up struggle, a spider fell down with his fine thread cobweb from the roof, the King stopped thinking and began to watch the movements of the spider.

5. It was a long way up to the ceiling dome,

And it hung by a rope so fine,

That how it would get to its cobweb home

King Bruce could not divine.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the distance between the spider and the round roof of cave was great and the thread of the cobweb was very fine that King Bruce could not fore tell that what would happen and how would spider reach his home.

6. It soon began to cling and crawl

Straight up with strong endeavour;

But down it came with slippery sprawl,

As near to the ground as ever.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that spider once took hold of cobweb thread and began to climb up with difficulty. It made an effort to go right up to the roof but it slipped and fell down on the earth as close to the ground as before its climb.

7. Up, up it ran, not a second, could stay,

To utter the least complaint,

Till it fell still lower and there it lay

A little dizzy and faint.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that after falling the Spider at once rose from the ground without waiting to complain and began to climb on. But it fell down again very badly. Its head began to whirl round and lay there for a while. This time he became dazed and unconscious.

8. Its head grew steady again it went,

And travelled a half yard higher,

It was a delicate thread it had to tread.

And a road where it feet would tire.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the spider recovered its senses and climbed half a yard higher than before. The thread however, was very delicate and there was a constant danger of its breaking down. There fore it was difficult and tire some for the spider to climb.

9. Again it fell and swung below,

But again it quickly mounted,

Till up and down, now fast, now slow

Nine brave attempts were counted.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the Spider once again fell down and it was hanging in the air. But without losing any time it moved up again. Some times it went up, some times it fell down, some times, its progress was fast, some times slow; and in this way, it made nine bold attempts to reach its cobweb.

10. “Sure” cried the King, “that foolish thing

Will strive no more to climb,

When it toils so hard to reach and cling,

And tumbles every time”.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the King Bruce said to himself that as spider had fallen for so many times. It must have found out that it could not reach its destination and would not make a further attempt at climbing. Because inspite of his hard labour and brave efforts it could not succeed.

11. But up the insect went one more,

Ah me! It is an anxious minute,

He’s only a foot from his cobweb door!

Oh, say will he lose or win it?

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the King was surprised to see that the spider was making another attempt. It was critical time for the king, he was not certain whether the spider would succeed or fail. Although it was only a foot away from its cobweb.

12. Steadly, steadly, inch by inch,

Higher and higher he got,

And a bold little runs at the very last pinch,

Put him into his native cot.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that the spider went on gaining ground slowly and surely inch by inch. It covered the distance and it made an attempt at last moment of extreme difficulty. At last it succeeded in getting into the cobweb.

13. “Bravo! Bravo!” the King cried out,

“All honour to those who try!

The spider up there defied despair;

He conquered, and why should not I”?

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that at the success of the Spider, the King was pleased very much. He appreciated the efforts of the spider by saying well-done. He said honour and glory falls to the lot of those who are never discouraged by failures but they try again and again. The spider did not mind disappointment and at last succeeded in reaching his cobweb. The King said if a spider can succeed by perseverance, there is no reason why he should fail.

14. And Bruce of Scotland braced his mind,

And gossips tell the tale,

That he tried once more as he tried before,

And that time did not fail.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “King Bruce and the Spider” written by Eliza Cook.

In this poem poetess explains that one should not lose his heart if he fails in his struggle once or twice. He should continue his struggle till success.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess tells that King Robert Bruce resolved to fight against the enemy once more and the story teller tell that he tried once more and this time he won a brilliant victory over his enemies.

The Hand that Rocks the Cradle is the Hand that Rules the World (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. Blessing on the hand of women!

Angels guard its strength and grace,

In the palace, cottage, hovel,

Oh, no matter where the place;

Would that never storms assailed it,

Rainbow ever gently curled;

For the hand that rocks the cradle

Is the hand that rules the world.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand rules the world” written by William Ress Wallace.

In this poem poet tries to explain that actual ruler of the world is mother. Because she looks after her children and tries her best to make them important and useful persons in the world.

Explanation:

In these lines poet prays for the blessings of God for mothers without any distinction of social status or place where they are living. He says that they may be protected by angels every where in the world in kings mansion or in poor man’s hut. She may be away from the sorrows and be blessed with peace and prosperity. As she brings up the child so she is the actual ruler of the world.

2. Infancy’s the tender fountain,

Power may with beauty flow,

Mother’s first to guide the streamlets,

From them souls un-resting grow.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand rules the world” written by William Ress Wallace.

In this poem poet tries to explain that actual ruler of the world is mother. Because she looks after her children and tries her best to make them important and useful persons in the world.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that child hood is just like soft fountain from it power and charms flow. If some one moulds it for good it will be good, if some one moulds it for evil it will be evil. So that tender fountain in the presence of mother learns the lessons of goodness and wisdom. The child’s uneasy and impulsive nature is nursed properly by loving care of mother. All exceptional personalities are due to the careful upbringing of their mothers. In real sense she is the ruler of the world.

3. Woman, how divine your mission

Here upon our natal sad!

Keep, oh, keep the young heart open

Always to the breath of God!

All true trophies of the ages

Are from mother’s love impearled;

For the hand that rocks the cradle

Is that hand that rules the world.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand rules the world” written by William Ress Wallace.

In this poem poet tries to explain that actual ruler of the world is mother. Because she looks after her children and tries her best to make them important and useful persons in the world.

Explanation:

In these lines poet addresses the woman and says that her mission was divine mission on the earth. Here the poet implores the mother to inspire children to the prayer and worship of God, whole heartedly. It is she who moulds the character that wins distinctions in the world. All the rewards won by different persons on different occasions are always decorated with gems and pearls of mother’s love and affection. In real sense she is the ruler of the world.

4. Blessing on the hand of woman!

Fathers, sons and daughters cry,

And the sacred song is mingled

With the worship in the sky

Mingles where no tempest darkness.

Rainbows ever more are hurled

For the hand that rocks the cradle

Is the hand that rules the world.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand rules the world” written by William Ress Wallace.

In this poem poet tries to explain that actual ruler of the world is mother. Because she looks after her children and tries her best to make them important and useful persons in the world.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that fathers, sons and daughters are praying loudly for the blessings of God on the hand woman. In those prayers the sacred song sung by angels is mixed with at the sky. That mixes there, where no evil storm can destroy or worsen and thing. Because she wipes away all the worries and anxieties from man’s mind and encourages him to face the dangers with grace and dignity. In real sense she is the ruler of the world.

Speak Gently (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. Speak gently; it is better far

To rule by love than fear.

Speak gently; let no harsh word mar

The good we may do here.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Speak gently” written by an Anonymous poet.

In this poem poet asks us to speak in soft and mild tone to all. Because kind words go deep into the heart of listener. The effect of speaking gently is good and long lasting.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that when we speak with others we should use kind words. If we want to rule the people, we should get their obedience by love. Because obedience secured by love is better than that which is the result of fear. He further says that we should use mild words and not harsh and unkind words, because harsh words may spoil our good deeds.

2. Speak gently to the little child;

Its love is sure to gain;

Teach it in accent soft and mild,

It may not long remain.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Speak gently” written by an Anonymous poet.

In this poem poet asks us to speak in soft and mild tone to all. Because kind words go deep into the heart of listener. The effect of speaking gently is good and long lasting.

Explanation:

In these line poet says that one should speak to a little child in soft and mild tone, it is certain that he will love him. If some one is teaching some thing to him, it might be taught in polite manner and soft accent, because who knows how long he will remain here.

3. Speak gently to the aged one;

Grieve not the careworn heart;

Whose sands of life are nearly run?

Let such in peace depart.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Speak gently” written by an Anonymous poet.

In this poem poet asks us to speak in soft and mild tone to all. Because kind words go deep into the heart of listener. The effect of speaking gently is good and long lasting.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that senior citizens be spoken in polite manner. One should use kind words while speaking to them. They are already sad and tired, so they may not be sadden. They have completed their time here in this world; they are here for very brief time. So they may be allowed to leave this world in pleasant mood.

4. Speak gently, it’s a little thing

Dropped in the heart’s deep well;

The good, the joy that it may bring

Eternity shall tell.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Speak gently” written by an Anonymous poet.

In this poem poet asks us to speak in soft and mild tone to all. Because kind words go deep into the heart of listener. The effect of speaking gently is good and long lasting.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that kind words, though they seem insignificant but they have magical effect on people. Because kind words touch the depth of human hearts. The reward of speaking gently will be gained in the next world.

Beautiful Hands (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. Such beautiful, beautiful hands,

They’re neither white nor small;

And you, I know, would scarcely think

That they were fair at all.

I’ve looked on hands whose from and hue.

A scuptor’s dream might be,

Yet are these aged wrinkled hands

Most beautiful to me.

Reference to context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Beautiful Hands” written by an American poetess Ellen M. H. Gates.

In this poem poetess praises mother’s hands for their spiritual beauty. According to her mother’s hands are symbol of love, sacrifice, labour and affection for her children.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess praises mother’s hands for their spiritual beauty. She says that though these hands are neither fair nor small and one would hardly think that they were beautiful ones. She says that she had seen the form and colour of these hands they were like dream of an artist who makes statues. Though now these hands are old and full of furrows but they are beautiful for her.

2. Such beautiful, beautiful hands!

Though heart were weary and sad.

These patient hands kept toiling on

That children might be glad,

I almost weep when looking back:

To child hood’s distant day!

I think how these hands rested not.

When mine were at their play.

Reference to context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Beautiful Hands” written by an American poetess Ellen M. H. Gates.

In this poem poetess praises mother’s hands for their spiritual beauty. According to her mother’s hands are symbol of love, sacrifice, labour and affection for her children.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess says that when se recalls child hoods days these hands worked very hard in order to make children happy. She says that she almost weeps when se recalls that how these hands rested not when children used to play. Being gloomy and sad they never stopped working and kept on working.

3. Such beautiful, beautiful hands!

They’re growing feeble now,

And time and pain have left their mark.

On hand, and heart and brow,

Alas! Alas! The nearing time.

And the sad, sad day to me,

When ‘neath the dailies out of sight,

These hands must folded be.

Reference to context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Beautiful Hands” written by an American poetess Ellen M. H. Gates.

In this poem poetess praises mother’s hands for their spiritual beauty. According to her mother’s hands are symbol of love, sacrifice, labour and affection for her children.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess expresses her sorrow and says that she is very sad to think that day by day these hands are growing weak and old. The signs of old age are being seen on heart, hand and fore head. She further says she is sorry to say that sad day is coming nearer in near future the person having these beautiful hands will pass away from this world and these beautiful hands would be folded and buried in grave under the daisy flowers.

4. But oh! Beyond the shadowy lands,

where all is bright and fair.

I know full well these dear old hands

Will palms of victory bear?

When crystal streams, through endless years,

Flow over golden sands,

And where the old are young again.

I’ll clasp my mother’s hands.

Reference to context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “Beautiful Hands” written by an American poetess Ellen M. H. Gates.

In this poem poetess praises mother’s hands for their spiritual beauty. According to her mother’s hands are symbol of love, sacrifice, labour and affection for her children.

Explanation:

In these lines poetess says that in coming world where things will be just, fair and beautiful. There old people will become young again. There will flow transparent rivers on golden sand. She is hopeful that there she will meet her mother and hold her hands in her own hands.

A Nation’s Strength (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. Not gold, but only men can make,

A people great and strong,

Men who for truth and honour’s sake,

Stand fast and suffer long.

Reference to context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “A Nation’s Strength” written by an American poet Ralph Waldo Emerson.

In this poem poet tells that wealth has nothing to do with the strength of a nation. It is only man who alone can make a nation great and strong.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that wealth can not make a nation strong and powerful. But only sincere men can make it strong. Brave and courageous men who are ready to suffer and who can stand firm for the sake of truth and honour during the period of hardships.

2. Brave men who work while others sleep,

Who dare while other fly

They build a nation’s pillars deep,

And lift them to the sky.

Reference to context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “A Nation’s Strength” written by an American poet Ralph Waldo Emerson.

In this poem poet tells that wealth has nothing to do with the strength of a nation. It is only man who alone can make a nation great and strong.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that secret of a nation’s greatness are indeed those heroes who work hard while others waste their time in enjoying comfortable sleep. They face all challenges of time bravely and courageously while others run away. Only these brave men can build their nation on fast and sure foundations of virtue and take it to highest point of greatness and make it very famous in the community of nations.

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