Wednesday, September 9, 2009

The Minstrel Boy (Explanation with Reference to Context)

1. The minstrel boy to the war is gone,

In the ranks of death you will find him,

His father’s sword eh has girded on,

And his wild harp slung behind him,

“Land of song!” said the warrior bard,

“Though all the world betrays thee,

One sword at least, thy rights shall guard,

One faithful harp shall praise thee!”

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The Minstrel Boy” written by Thomas Moore.

In this poem poet explains that it is impossible to bind the soul that is born free.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that musician boy has gone to fight in the war. He will be seen in the first ranks, where a persons faces death. He has put on his father’s sword around his waist and his rustic harp was hanging behind him. The poet who was writing poetry of war evens wrote that if whole world betrays the mother land but it is sure that there would be a sword that would protect its rights and there would be a harp which would play the songs of freedom of homeland.

2. The minstrel fell! But the foeman’s chain

Could not bring his proud soul under;

The harp he loved never spoke again,

For he tore its chards as under,

And said, “No chains shall sully thee,

Thou soul of love and bravery!

They songs were made for the pure and free,

They shall never sound in slavery.

Reference to Context:

These lines have been taken from the poem “The Minstrel Boy” written by Thomas Moore.

In this poem poet explains that it is impossible to bind the soul that is born free.

Explanation:

In these lines poet says that the musician boy was killed in the war. But his proud soul was not conquered by the chains of enemy. The enemy defeated him physically but was not able to conquer his soul. His harp which was very dear to him did not sing more, because when he was wounded he tore its strings. He said to it that as it was soul of love and boldness so it could no be in a position to sing for enemy. Because it’s songs were for the pure and free people, not for the tyrant persons. So it’s songs would never be heard in slavery.

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3 Responses to “The Minstrel Boy (Explanation with Reference to Context)”

blooms veeze said...
January 8, 2012 at 12:14 AM

nyc..


Anonymous said...
April 2, 2014 at 2:27 AM

excellent


Javeriya Faisal said...
March 8, 2016 at 12:44 PM

Good and precised explaination


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